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Monday, July 21, 2008

Summer 2008 Learning in 3D Class Three

Here we are sitting around the conference room discussing our visits to far away places in the metaverse.

This was an exciting class, we first learned to create note cards and then learning about Learning Archetypes in Second Life which are picking up some momentum.

We also learned some ideas about developing lessons within Second Life in terms of what needs to be created to make a successful educational experience in a 3D world.

We then took a tour of Second Life with some spots that I have visited in the past. The students kept a note card of their travels. Then we met in the conference room and debriefed our visits to the different locations. It was an interesting class.
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12 comments:

jennifer said...

Class was fun tonight...The schizophrenia place was very interesting. The class gave me a few new ideas as to how Second Life can be used as an educational tool. I would love to make a living designing learning in SL!

Dixie said...

these worlds (or islands) we visit are amazing. the development teams have obviously poured hours over planning and designing. i'm totally wow'ed. i especially loved visiting the NOAA site...but am now curious about the other sites visited by my class peers. very cool.

Lidia Muircastle said...

This class and my great group of freshmen are helping me connect the dots with what I'm learning in the MSIT program and how to teach using instructional technology. I get excited from their reports of each new thing they are see and do in SL. Bear with me as I continue to learn to walk and talk in a virtual world. Please visit "The Collective" the island I went to http://slurl.com/secondlife/The%20Collective/48/187/47
It is described as a "sandbox of creativity" with large abstract items you interact with. I really sat on a cannonball was thrust inside a large oversize cannon that blew me across the island to a safe landing in the sand. Wild, weird, fun!

Brett S. said...

The notecard was a great way to do a virtual tour. Some of the islands were very impressive with the amount of work that must have gone into designing them. One thing that I consistently found myself asking was "why am I here?" I couldn't always figure out the point of the site or what I was supposed to be learning. I'm not sure if this is on my part or unclear directions in SL, or a combination of both.

John K. said...

The different areas visited tonight showed me two good examples of well built places and one example of a place that lacked key elements. The first two places I visited displayed useful information right away on where you were and where to go/ what to do. The last place I went to did not have any of this. I felt lost on what I was suppose to do. I cant say for sure that these things werent there but I couldnt find them. Tongihts class was a great example of 3 beautiful places but without instructional elements guiding the user, they are not so meaningful.

Lynn T. said...

Second Life is so cool. I love learning all the new places and visiting them. It amazes me the structures that are built; I can’t imagine the time people have put into them. Visiting these cool places gives me inspiration to learn how to build and to be creative. Exploring on my own was a little scary; there are some scary people out there…but now that we have these new sites, I feel like I am visiting safer places.

J Ramos said...

Class was really exciting this past week. I loved going to the various worlds and learning about the possibilities of SL. I wrote an article and people loved how deep and diverse it is. My freshman enjoyed the notecard and how they could explore new worlds as well!

Joanna K. said...

I really enjoyed this class. It really opened my eyes to the possibilities for learning in second life-- especially for the experiences that are available like riding an airplane through a hurricane! I look forward to testing out my own little tour on my students! I like the idea that the notecard was used for the tour so that students can explore on their own-- but guided to "safe zones." The whole notecard thing makes me curious... could a notecard be posted on an object so that anyone could take the tour and be totally asynchronous?

Mark Kreisher said...

Class was extremely interesting. The tour note card really opened my eyes to the extent of structure that can be applied to a classroom setting. This form of learning would really interest students and provide an experience for students. After experiencing the tour, I feel that learning in 3D might be an exciting new alternative to traditional webquests.

Ryan L. sittler said...

This was a very interesting class... and in many ways... this is the class that really "opened me up" to seeing how SL could be used well for instructional purposes.

The "Schizophrenia" experience was disturbing... but surprisingly engrossing... and really changed my thoughs as to "how" SL can be used. Before this class, I thought of it as Centra/Adobe Connect/Horizon Wimba in 3d...
no longer.

Mamma Dukes said...

OK so I'm a little late in posting to the Blog.. But at any rate here are my comments.

SL and it's environs provide immersion in the problem space and allow the learner to interact with the problem over long periods of time. This allows for stronger learning and better retention.

By providing real-life (or second life)detail to the interaction the learner can experience the problem within a realistic context and see the results of her interaction choices more immeditely. Thus, as we know, immediate feedback can condition the learner's expectations and consequence as the action takes place.

Additionally, the learner is perturbed so that solving the problem becomes a quest for the solution. Dave Johnassen always said that learning to problem solve involves perturbing the learner. This does that.

Additionally, peer interaction within this environment is a great way to get students to share their knowledge thereby strengthening what they already know by sharing (teaching) others.

Bruner tells us that narritive is how we learn naturally. SL provides that story space in that you are living the story of your avatar's experience in SL and can share this with others. This story link provides better encoding of the situation and results.

brett said...

This is fascinating.
I’d been taught that left-aligned labels are preferred, to support the prototypical F-shaped eye-tracking heatmap of web browsing. The idea is that it supports easy vertical scanning.

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